2016 Reading List

Fiction
Life, Universe, and Everything — Douglas Adams
Ordinary Jack — Helen Cresswell
The Zero Stone — Andre Norton
Warbound — Larry Correia
The Ocean at the End of the Lane — Neil Gaiman
Pines — Blake Crouch
Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians — Brandon Sanderson
The Fellowship of the Ring — JRR Tolkien
Please Look After Mom — Shin Kyung-Sook
Alas, Babylon — Pat Frank
All She was Worth — Miyuke Miyabe
The Tattoo Murder Case — Akimitsu Takagi
Wrong Side of Hell — Sonya Bateman
The Doorbell Rang — Rex Stout
A Wild Sheep Chase — Haruki Murakami
Rebecca — Daphne du Maurier

Nonfiction
Eugenics and Other Evils — G. K. Chesterton
Compost Everything — David the Good
A Prisoner of the Khaleef: Twelve Years Captivity at Omdurman — Charles Neufelf
The Return of the Great Depression — Vox Day
The Story of the Malakand Field Force — Winston Churchill
Something Terrible Has Happened — Peter Van Slingerland

I had the goal of reading 24 novels in 2016 and clearly didn’t come close.  Last semester was a disaster on so many levels.  I read one book in September and one in December and nothing in between.  I did read more nonfiction than the prior year though.

Out of 16 novels, 11 were ones I’d never read before and of those only two were from authors whom I had read something else of theirs before.  I’m usually really bad about refusing to try new authors.  (Why waste time reading stuff that’s likely to be crap?)  I went on kind of an Asian binge which was very interesting because I’d only ever read one Asian novel before.

All nonfiction books were ones I’d never read before. Only two authors were not new to me (Chesterton, Vox).

Novels were kind of mixed for enjoyment but nonfiction was uniformly great.  David the Good is undoubtedly the best in that regard though because who on earth would ever expect a book on compost to be funny?  (Plus after you read it, you can shout “compost it!” every time someone tries to throw something away.)

As for 2017: goal is 24 novels again.  I can’t decide when it comes to nonfiction if I want to try to become an expert on communism in America or on the British Empire.  Maybe both.

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